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Oh, Sony — not again. We’ve just received numerous tips that Lulz Security has broken into SonyPictures.com, where it claims to have stolen the personal information of over 1,000,000 users — all stored (disgracefully) in plain text format. Lulz claims the heist was performed with a simple SQL injection — just like we saw the last time around. A portion of the group’s exploit is posted online in a RAR file, which contains over 50,000 email / password combos of unfortunate users. We’ve downloaded this file (at our own risk, mind you) and can verify these sensitive bits are now in the wild, though it remains unclear if what’s published matches reality. In addition to user information, the group has blurted out over 20,000 Sony music coupons, and the admin database (including email addresses and passwords) for BMG Belgium employees. Fresh off the heels of the PlayStation Network restoration, we’re guessing the fine folks in Sony’s IT department are now surviving solely on adrenaline shots.

[Thanks to everyone that sent this in]

Sony Pictures hacked by Lulz Security, 1,000,000 passwords claimed stolen originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Jun 2011 17:47:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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FaceNiff
Remember Firesheep? Well, the cookie snatching Firefox extension now has a more portable cousin called FaceNiff. This Android app listens in on WiFi networks (even ones encrypted with WEP, WPA, or WPA2) and lets you hop on to the accounts of anyone sharing the wireless connection with you. Right now it works with Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Nasza-Klasa (a Polish Facebook clone), but developer Bartosz Ponurkiewicz promises more are coming. You’ll need to be rooted to run FaceNiff — luckily, we had such a device laying around and gave the tap-to-hack app a try. Within 30 seconds it identified the Facebook account we had open on our laptop and had us posting updates from the phone. At least with Firesheep you had to sit down and open up a laptop, now you can hijack Twitter profiles as you stroll by Starbucks and it’ll just look like you’re sending a text message (but you wouldn’t do that… would you?). One more image and a video are after the break.

Continue reading FaceNiff makes Facebook hacking a portable, one-tap affair (video)

FaceNiff makes Facebook hacking a portable, one-tap affair (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Jun 2011 02:28:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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What’s better than a seasoned crime fighter? How about a seasoned crime fighter packing a 300,000-volt punch? A new prototype stun-glove is poised to make such Robocop-inspired dreams a reality, integrating a non-lethal taser, LED flashlight, and laser guided video camera into a fetching piece of futuristic armor. Activated by pulling out a grenade-like pin and palming an embedded finger pad, the Armstar BodyGuard 9XI-HD01 sparks a loud and visible arc of electricity between its wrist-mounted taser spikes, a sight that inventor David Brown hopes will encourage would-be crooks to surrender. The gauntlet’s hard plastic shell is even roomy enough to add GPS equipment, biometrics, chemical sensors, or other embedded additions, as needed. The first batch of pre-production superhero gloves will hit the streets of LA later this year for testing and evaluation. Need more? Check out the via to see Kevin Costner (what field of dreams did he walk out of?) take the edge off this shocker in a surprisingly dull video.

BodyGuard stun-glove leaps out of comic books, into the arms of LA Sheriff’s Department originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Jun 2011 10:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Popular Science  |  sourceArmstar, PDF  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
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We’ve recently seen Google crack down on rogue apps and patch some server-side security issues, but let’s not forget Android does have a small measure of built-in security: app permissions. But as with those pesky EULAs, many users tend to breeze through the permissions screen. And Android forces even the most attentive readers to accept or deny all permissions requested by an app. But the newest nightly builds of the CyanogenMod custom ROM include a clever patch allowing users to grant and revoke permissions individually — something like the TISSA security manager we’re still awaiting. Obviously playing God with permissions can crash your applications: with great power comes great responsibility. But we figure if you’re running aftermarket firmware on a rooted phone, you’re comfortable experimenting. See how it works in the video after the break, then hit the source link to download.

Continue reading New CyanogenMod lets you rule Android app permissions with an iron fist

Filed under: Cellphones, Software

New CyanogenMod lets you rule Android app permissions with an iron fist originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 24 May 2011 13:34:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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Tor
Soon political dissidents, whistle blowers, and those trying to cheat MLB.TV’s blackout restrictions will have an easier way to protect their privacy thanks to a dedicated Tor Browser. For those of you unfamiliar with it, Tor is a tool for anonymizing web browsing and communications through encryption and proxy servers. Trouble is, it requires both a browser extension and a standalone app to work — leaving average users “horribly confused,” according to developer Mike Perry. So, the organization has decided to retire the Tor Button and create its own fork of Firefox with private browsing features baked in. As an added benefit, Tor will no longer be at the mercy of Mozilla to fix bugs that affect privacy and security. For now, the group will focus on its downloadable bundle with automatic configuration scripts for simplifying setup, but eventually the paranoid will have a browser they can finally call their own.

Tor to fork Firefox for simplified anonymous browsing, doesn’t think you’re paranoid originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 07 May 2011 21:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink PC World  |  sourceThe Tor Blog  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
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Sony woes continue as SOE confirms data breach
Are you starting to feel bad for Sony yet? No? Maybe this will change your mind. Sony Online Entertainment has, apparently, been the victim of another breach that has, according to Nikkei.com, resulted in the release of 12,700 credit card numbers — and presumably some other information as well. 4,300 of those credit card numbers are said to be Japanese, but no saying how many are American. Thankfully, data is said to be from 2007, minimizing the number of still-valid credit cards exposed making us wonder if perhaps this wasn’t some sort of backup that was exposed. Regardless, SOE’s online services were taken offline earlier today and, well, now we know why. We’re presently expecting further information from the company but, until then, feel free to continue cowering in the corner and quietly sobbing onto your compromised credit cards.

[Warning: subscription required]

Update: According to the Wall Street Journal, Sony has also confirmed that the latest attack accessed personal information for a staggering 24.6 million accounts. Such info includes names, addresses, telephone numbers, email addresses, gender, date of birth, login ID, and hashed passwords. Ruh roh.

Sony woes continue as SOE confirms data breach (update: 24.6 million accounts affected) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 02 May 2011 20:29:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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Back in 2005, we reported on a little something called the Prism 200, which allowed its holder to essentially see what folks were doing on the other side of a wall. Since then, we’ve seen plenty of devices that boast the same claims, but it wasn’t until recently that the makers of the Prism 200 created a device that can actually see inside those walls. Looking something akin to an old school punch clock, Cambridge Consultants’ Sprint in-wall radar imaging system provides 3D renderings of items embedded in walls, floors, and even ceilings. Where as existing X-ray systems require access to both sides of a wall, Sprint’s radar setup allows users to see what’s going on inside without dual access. As you might imagine, Cambridge is pushing this thing as a security tool, allowing for detection of bombs, drugs, dead bodies — you know, the usual bad guy stuff. Sprint is currently undergoing testing. Full PR after the break.

Continue reading Sprint radar imaging system peeps inside walls, floors to detect bombs, tell-tale hearts

Sprint radar imaging system peeps inside walls, floors to detect bombs, tell-tale hearts originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 09 Apr 2011 13:17:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceCambridge Consultants  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
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