VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

A computer solving a Rubik’s cube? P’shaw. Doing it in 10.69 seconds? Been there, record set. But to crack one of any size? Color us impressed. Erik Demaine of MIT did just that, developing an algorithm that applies to cubes no matter how ambitious their dimensions. Pretty early on, he realized he needed to take a different angle than he would with a standard 3 x 3 x 3 puzzle, which other scientists have tackled by borrowing computers from Google to consider all 43 quintillion possible moves — a strategy known simply as “brute force.” As you can imagine, that’s not exactly a viable solution when you’re wrestling with an 11 x 11 x 11 cube. So Demaine and his team settled on an approach that’s actually a riff on one commonly used by Rubik’s enthusiasts, who might attempt to move a square into its desired position while leaving the rest of the cube as unchanged as possible. That’s a tedious way to go, of course, so instead The researchers grouped several cubies that all needed to go in the same direction, a tactic that reduced the number of moves by a factor of log n, with n representing the length of any of the cube’s sides. Since moving individual cubies into an ideal spot requires a number of moves equal to n², the final algorithm is n²/log n. If we just lost you non-math majors with that formula, rest assured that the scientists expect folks won’t be able to apply it directly, per se, though he does say it could help cube-solvers sharpen their strategy. Other that, all you overachievers out there, you’re still on your own with that 20 x 20 x 20.

Scientists develop algorithm to solve Rubik’s cubes of any size originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 01 Jul 2011 12:57:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceNew Scientist  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

AppBlaster
Gun accessories for your Wiimote or Move wands are old hat but, we can’t help but be at least a little intrigued by this rifle-like dock for the iPhone. The appBlaster is an accessory from apptoyz designed specifically for use with the company’s Alien Attack iOS game. Slide in your iDevice and fire up the AR shooter and you'll be treated to a bit of Piper-vision, exposing the invisible aliens in our midst. Pull the triggers and two capacitive pads touch the screen to fire at the invaders that only you can see. The appBlaster is available for pre-order now at RED5 for £19.99 (about $32) and will official hit shelves on July 7. Check out the PR after the break.

Continue reading appBlaster iPhone accessory lets you kick AR alien butt, bubblegum not included

appBlaster iPhone accessory lets you kick AR alien butt, bubblegum not included originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 23 Jun 2011 04:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

You could enjoy that Big Mac in the peace and artery-clogging quiet of your local McDonald’s, or you could just catch the next flight to Stockholm, where Ronald apparently serves his meals with a side of interactive, outdoor gaming. It’s all part of something called Pick n’ Play — a new (and pretty ingenious) ad campaign that invites pedestrians to play a game of Pong on a giant Mickey D’s billboard, using only their smartphones. All you have to do is stand in front of the display, log on to Pick n’ Play’s site from your handheld, and wait for your phone to verify your location. From there, you’ll have to manipulate an onscreen paddle using your device’s touchscreen, while doing battle with a game that gets increasingly more difficult. Last thirty seconds, though, and you’ll get a free, lipid-drenched treat of your choice, courtesy of the Golden Arches. Best of all, you won’t even have to download an app to get your Pong on — putting you one step closer to that coronary you’ve always wanted. Trot past the break to see it for yourself.

Continue reading McDonald’s interactive Pong billboard brings big-screen elation, tomorrow’s lunch

McDonald’s interactive Pong billboard brings big-screen elation, tomorrow’s lunch originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 05 Jun 2011 23:58:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink The Next Web  |  sourcePick n’ Play  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Angry Birds was designed to be played on a device that fits in your pocket, so playing the game projected on a wall doesn’t exactly feel natural. Throw a life-size slingshot into the mix, though, and things really get zany. The slingshot was on hand at the University of Queensland (Australia) last night, and had apparently been “months in the making.” Details are scant, so we’re not sure exactly how the slingshot communicates with the game, but however it works, it appears able to do its thing fairly well — with only a brief delay after release. This slingshot appearance may be a one-time deal, so if you want to try flicking the bird on the big screen, Angry Birds for Chrome (and a mouse) may be your best option for now.

Continue reading Life-size Angry Birds comes with giant slingshot, more realistic explosive death (video)

Life-size Angry Birds comes with giant slingshot, more realistic explosive death (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Jun 2011 06:18:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Nowhere Else  |  sourceUniversity of Queensland  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Remember Sony’s SmartAR? The markerless AR technology that promises reality augmentation without the need for unsightly tattoos? It’s back again, showing itself once more after an all-too-brief 48 hour layoff. A new live-demo shows Sony’s markerless object recognition system focusing on posters, tables, books, and coffee cups in lieu of the traditional AR card — allowing it recognize multiple objects at once. Focusing on objects rather than markers allow augmented entities to interact more naturally with their environment. For instance, bouncing AR balls plummet off the edge of a table, and realistically ricochet off of a book placed in their path. Objects don’t even need to remain on screen, as demonstrated by an AR pop-up menu that remained viewable even after the object-marker that spawned it left the viewer’s field of vision. Sony seems to have built the groundwork of an augmented reality system that might actually be useful — pair this up with a set of swank AR glasses (or better yet, holographic AR glasses), and we’ll have a vision of the future we can really look forward to.

Sony’s SmartAR demoed live, raises the bar for augmented reality (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 22 May 2011 17:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Engadget Japan  |  sourceSony (YouTube)  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)



Some may agree that over the years, augmented reality’s been slowly losing its appeal given its sometimes laggy and unreliable performance — most implementations require a weird marker to be in clear sight, and the graphics rendering speed on your handheld device would rely on your slow and steady hands. As such, we were initially skeptical when Sony’s SmartAR announcement came along; but as you can see in the video above, said technology took us by surprise with its super slick responsiveness, and the markerless object recognition makes a compelling hassle-free selling point. What’s more, the same clip also shows off SmartAR handling large 3D space with ease — notice how the virtual objects continue to animate even when the original anchor object is out of sight. Sony hasn’t given any dates here, but there’s no doubt that once SmartAR is available to game developers and advertisers, it’ll rake in some nice pocket money for the electronics giant.

Continue reading Sony SmartAR delivers high-speed markerless augmented reality, blows minds (video)

Sony SmartAR delivers high-speed markerless augmented reality, blows minds (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 19 May 2011 01:26:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceSony (YouTube)  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Google Chrome may have come out of Pwn2Own unscathed, but you can rip through any website it (or another HTML5-compliant browser) displays — just pull out your handy Katamari Damacy ball and wreak havok on the page. Na NAaaa, na na na na na na na, na na na na na naaaa…

Alternatively, paste the following Javascript into a bookmark, and then click it when you’re tiring of a page.
javascript:var i,s,ss=['http://kathack.com/js/kh.js','http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.5.1/jquery.min.js'];
for(i=0;i!=ss.length;i++){s=document.createElement(‘script’);s.src=ss[i];document.body.appendChild(s);}void(0);

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


That’s right, kids: the tyranny of the browser window is over! Thanks to Corey from ProbablyInteractive (as well as clever use of HTML5 and the Canvas tag), we now have URL Hunter. Using the left and right arrows keys, the player controls an ASCII “O” that has nothing better to do all day but kill the letter “a.” When you find yourself on top of the “a” key, hit the space bar to earn a point. Simple? In theory, yes. But trust us — It’s harder than it sounds! Hit the source link to try for yourself.

URL Hunter game takes place entirely in your browser’s address bar, courtesy of HTML5 originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 08 Mar 2011 16:11:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Geek.com  |  sourceProbablyInteractive  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

The Bud reminds me of the Vulcan game of Kal-toh. Players take turns joining one twig to another but the connected ends must be the same color. As the tree gets larger, one must strategically place their twigs to prevent the entire unit from falling over. It’s one of those games that would totally drive me crazy but I would still play it again and again.

The Bud is an iF concept design entry for 2011

Designer: Joshua Chao

———-

Yanko Design
Timeless Designs – Explore wonderful concepts from around the world!
Yanko Design Store – We are about more than just concepts. See what’s hot at the YD Store!

Source: Yanko Design
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Oh, this isn’t weird at all! The Kissing Controller, an experimental project by one Hye Yeon Nam, is designed so that players of a bowling game can impart power and direction to their spherical projectile by performing the timeless act of smooching one another. A customized headset is required for one of the participants, acting as the input receiver, while the other straps a magnet to his or her tongue and goes to town with some literal full motion controls. Thrust is added to the on-screen ball in accordance with how vigorously you move your tongue around, something we’re sure your partner will appreciate. Video after the break.

Continue reading Kiss Controller lets you play a bowling game with your tongue… while it’s in someone else’s mouth (video)

Kiss Controller lets you play a bowling game with your tongue… while it’s in someone else’s mouth (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 22 Feb 2011 06:30:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Kotaku  |  sourceHye Yeon Nam  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
Blog WebMastered by All in One Webmaster.
  • RSS
  • YouTube
  • IMDb

Featuring YD Feedwordpress Content Filter Plugin