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Razer may be best known for its well-regarded line of angular, extreme gaming peripherals for the core PC gaming set – think mice, keyboards, mouse pads and yes, motion controllers – but the San Diego-based company is looking to branch out into an area you may not have expected: efficient (and graphically anemic) netbook computers.

While it’s an unusual move for the peripheral maker, it’s not a departure from their core competency. Gaming laptops may have whittled down the bulk required for a high-end gaming experience but they’re still far from portable. Inversely, netbooks are steadily becoming increasingly capable laptop replacements, but fall short when performing the most demanding tasks … like video gaming.

Gallery: Razer Switchblade (CES 2011)

Continue reading Razer Switchblade impressions: It’s a 7″ gaming PC with an LCD keyboard

JoystiqRazer Switchblade impressions: It’s a 7″ gaming PC with an LCD keyboard originally appeared on Joystiq on Thu, 13 Jan 2011 20:20:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Joystiq
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The scariest looking peripheral at CES 2011? Possibly. But for those looking to gain a split-second edge on the competition, the N-Control Avenger just may be the solution Xbox 360 gamers have been looking for. Announced just a couple of months ago, the company was here in Las Vegas to actually demonstrate a fully functional model. But simply, it straps onto your first-party 360 controller, adding triggers, straps, cables and all sorts of other contraptions that aim to give you improved alternatives to pressing buttons (while freeing your thumbs up to more accurately operate the analog joysticks). Enough talk — hop on past the break to see how exactly this $60 shell gets down to business.

Gallery: N-Control Avenger Xbox 360 attachment gets a CES overview (video)

Continue reading N-Control Avenger Xbox 360 attachment gets a CES overview (video)

N-Control Avenger Xbox 360 attachment gets a CES overview (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 10 Jan 2011 08:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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As good old-fashioned girly men, we’re always looking for excuses to get our nails done, so our heartfelt thanks go out to Guangzhou Taiji Electronics and their ArtPro Nail Printer line. You put a couple of white base coats on, stick your hand inside, align the desired image to your nail, and hit print — and an inkjet head (we saw a Lenovo cartridge inside) goes to work. A few seconds later, you’re ready to seal the deal with clearcoat. A simple idea, well-executed and highly satisfying. Video of our experience inside the future of the beauty industry after the jump.

Gallery: ArtPro Nail Printer V6.1

Continue reading ArtPro Nail Printer V6.1 hands-in (video)

ArtPro Nail Printer V6.1 hands-in (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 10 Jan 2011 05:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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PixelOptics is demoing what it claims is the most significant development in prescription eyewear in 50 years: emPower! PixelOptics’ glasses offer up better field of view and less distortion than traditional lenses by sandwiching an LCD-like layer in the glass that can be focused with an electrical charge. The set’s inbuilt micro-machine accelerometer detects when you tip your head down — when you read, for example — and triggers the glasses’ focal area for presbyopia. The emPower! lens can also be set to manual and is then activated by a swipe of your finger on the frame. The kit includes the glasses and the inductive charger that will keep the eyewear powered up and running for a couple days. We were able to get some video of the lens in action focusing on a tie — it is impressive to say the least — the change happens as quickly as your eye blinks and is not noticeable when not activated. We’d say PixelOptics is on to something here, and if you’re the type to plonk down $1,200 for a pair of glasses, these are definitely worth a peek. The only thing missing is a micro speaker that blasts out Bionic Man sounds each time you fire them up — but we’ve great hope somebody will hack that in.

Gallery: PixelOptics emPower! electronic eyeglasses hands-on

Continue reading PixelOptics emPower! electronic eyeglasses hands-on

PixelOptics emPower! electronic eyeglasses hands-on originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 08 Jan 2011 19:33:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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It’s Vegas, so it’s not completely unsurprising to see folks like Lady Gaga and T-Pain stopping by unannounced. But seeing the latter over at a Jakks Pacific booth at CES? Not exactly — shall we say — expected. Regardless, T-Pain was most definitely in the house, primarily to showcase his newest $39.99 accessory, the I Am T-Pain microphone. For all intents and purposes, this here mic is your dream come true, enabling you to sing into it and hear it emitted back with a “T-Pain Effect” embedded. In other words, it’s your autotune instrument of choice. There’s a bit of inbuilt memory as well, enabling users to record clips for future hysteria, while also giving them the chance to blend in T-Pain remarks as they rap and offload their favorite clips to their PC. It’s absurd in every sense of the word, making it impossible to pass up. If that makes any sense. Head on past the break for an interview with the man himself, courtesy of our pals over at TUAW.

Continue reading T-Pain stops by CES 2011 to plug patently ridiculous, amazing I Am T-Pain microphone (video)

T-Pain stops by CES 2011 to plug patently ridiculous, amazing I Am T-Pain microphone (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 08 Jan 2011 15:48:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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Ambidextrous, capacitive, programmable, open source, five simultaneous touch inputs. The Misa Digital Kitara has quite the laundry list of goodies to boast about, but we couldn’t let it slide through CES without getting our fingers on it and exploring for ourselves. The first thing that strikes you about this guitar-shaped synthesizer is its weight distribution — it’s no heavier than a good electric guitar, but a lot more of that weight is contained within its neck — and the second will inevitably be its lightning-quick response to touch. Misa tells us latency is less than 5 milliseconds and it felt like it.

There are two main modes of operation: a string mode, as seen above, and a ball mode allowing for even more adjustability. Both modes can then be further tweaked by choosing between the red and blue setting, with the former allowing for the performance of hammer-ons. Sliding your finger around the 8-inch touchscreen can do all sorts of wonderful things as well, such as altering pitch, tempo and volume, while those fearful of having no tactile feedback in string mode can apply a clear sheet over the screen that has tiny little ridges where the strings would usually reside. We say “usually,” because you’ll be able to configure the distance between the imaginary strings for yourself. The Kitara runs an open source Linux OS, which will be updatable via USB and is already compatible with Mac, PC and, naturally, Linux machines. It also has more than a hundred sound presets and we’ve been promised the option to customize them and create new ones by playing around with the algorithms in the future.

The black Kitara is made out of good old plastic (but it’s made very well) and costs $849 whereas the silver one you see in the gallery below is constructed out of a single block of aluminum and will set buyers back $2,899. Pre-orders are going on now through Misa Digital’s online store and shipping is set to start on April 3. Video follows below.

Gallery: Misa Digital Kitara hands-on

Continue reading Misa Digital Kitara hands-on preview (video)

Misa Digital Kitara hands-on preview (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 08 Jan 2011 10:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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Here’s one of CES 2011′s less technical, but most awesome, revelations: Mattel is working on a board game adaptation of Rovio’s mobile hit, Angry Birds. The game looks like a pretty authentic recreation of its source material; players draw “Mission Cards” depicting structures of bricks and pigs, which they then build using plastic models included in the game. Oh, and then they shoot birds at those structures using a tiny slingshot. That part is pretty integral to the whole experience, apparently.

The game will cost $14.99 when it launches worldwide this May. Even if you don’t want the board game, $14.99 is a perfectly reasonable price for a tiny catapult. Just think of all the tiny things you can terrorize with a catapult of that size!

JoystiqAngry Birds board game coming this May from Mattel originally appeared on Joystiq on Fri, 07 Jan 2011 15:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Joystiq
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Sony went seriously 3D-crazy at CES this year, and in addition to the slew of shipping 3D products, the company is showing off some futuristic prototypes — including this 3D head-mounted display that features a 720p OLED display for each eye, simulated 5.1 surround audio, and super-slick blue LED piping. No price, no availability, and no practical functionality since there’s no way to keep the thing on your face without your hands, but c’mon — you know you want one. Video after the break.

Gallery: Sony’s 3D head-mounted display prototype face-on

Continue reading Sony’s 3D head-mounted display prototype face-on

Sony’s 3D head-mounted display prototype face-on originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 06 Jan 2011 00:13:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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Oh yes, that up there is Samsung’s new 13.3-inch 9 Series laptop, and yes, it’s said to be the “thinnest and lightest 13-inch notebook available.” Revealed ahead of Samsung’s CES presser, the duralumin machine weighs just 2.89 pounds and measures .68 inches thick — in comparison, the 13-inch MacBook Air measures 0.11 to 0.68 inches thick and weighs 2.9 pounds. Those specs seem pretty darn comparable to us, but there’s no denying this thing is rail thing, so we guess we can let Samsung slide with its lofty marketing claims. Unlike the others that have attempted to craft incredibly thin Windows laptops (see: Adamo XPS), Samsung has managed to cram this thing with power, ports, and features. There’s no optical drive, but it has Ethernet, HDMI, and USB sockets and a headphone jack. Perhaps even more impressive is what’s Inside — it’s got a brand new Core i5 2537M processor, 128GB SSD, and 4GB of RAM. Not enough for you? Its backlit keyboard, 400 nit LED-backlit display, and two 1.5-watt speakers and a sub-woofer should seal the deal. So, how much for that beauty? Samsung says it should be around $1,600, though it isn’t providing a release date right now. We are bursting at the seams to get our hands all over that daring black chassis — stay tuned for some hands-on impressions.

Gallery: Samsung 9 Series laptop

Samsung 9 Series laptop unveiled, ready to slice some MacBook Air originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 05 Jan 2011 14:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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