VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Until now, mobile app developers have followed a pretty predictable MO: develop for iOS first, Android second, and everyone else after that. Since last year, many of you code monkeys out there have been tapping into Nitobi’s PhoneGap, a project that makes it easier to churn out apps for almost every OS, all at once. It’s been picking up steam, with about 40,000 downloads per month, 600,000 in total, and a steady stream of donations. That all culminated this weekend with the release of PhoneGap 1.0, which lets devs use HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to write and deploy apps for iOS, Android, BlackBerry, webOS, Bada, and Symbian. That’s a long list indeed, but we see one glaring omission: Windows Phone 7. Hit the source link to download it for free and check out the promo video below for an oh-so quick overview.

Update: Oops! Looks like WP7 is included! Our apologies, and feel free to celebrate accordingly.

Continue reading PhoneGap 1.0 lets devs write apps for seven platforms (video)

PhoneGap 1.0 lets devs write apps for seven platforms (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 01 Aug 2011 11:20:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink TheNextWeb  |  sourcePhoneGap  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


As far as most of us are concerned, if we’re going to pay a lot for a phone — you know, like, $350 on contract — it had better come with the works. We’re talking a qHD display, dual-core processor, 8 megapixel camera with 1080p recording, NFC, 1GB of RAM, 16GB of storage, and a 4G radio, to boot. If you’re someone who buys things made by Tag Heuer, you've got different priorities. The company just introduced the Link Phone, a darling clunker of a handset festooned with steel, 18K rose gold, or titanium, topped off with leather, alligator- and lizard-skin, rubber, and diamond accents — a medley that'll set you back no less than €4,700 ($6,712). What's that you say? You want specs? The Link, named after the Swiss outfit’s storied watch line, runs Android 2.2 — a clear step up from its feature phone predecessor. Other ho-hum features include the 3.5-inch (800 x 480) display, 5 megapixel autofocus camera, 256MB internal memory, an 8GB memory card, 1400 mAh battery, and EDGE / HSUPA connectivity. Tag Heuer also says it’ll be particularly durable, though it’s coming up short on specifics. Somehow, though, we don’t think it will survive when we accidentally drop it in our gold-plated toilet.

Gallery: Tag Heuer Link Phone

Continue reading Tag Heuer outs $6,700 Link Phone for those who like alligator skin with their Froyo (video)

Tag Heuer outs $6,700 Link Phone for those who like alligator skin with their Froyo (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 28 Jun 2011 10:18:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceaBlogToRead  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Have you ever missed an extremely important phone call or text because you were too busy finishing those TPS reports on your personal computing machine? There’s a Chrome add-on for that. We went hands-on with a new extension (and accompanying Android app) called MightyText, a free notification service launched today that syncs your phone’s texts and calls to your computer in real-time. The idea is crazy simple, yet adds unyielding convenience: incoming SMS messages appear on your screen as a pop-up, giving you the option to read and reply to them without touching or even looking at the phone. The full extension will show each conversation thread in its entirety, as well as call logs.

When sent from the computer, texts are still patched through from your phone number, so your colleagues will still see your messages coming through with your name on them. To make the service even more appealing, pop-ups alert you to incoming calls, so you can either hurry to find your phone or just send the caller a canned auto-text reply. It sounds like a great concept, but does it do the job? Head on past the break to learn our first impressions of the program.

Continue reading MightyText pushes messages and incoming call alerts to your computer (hands-on)

MightyText pushes messages and incoming call alerts to your computer (hands-on) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 22 Jun 2011 14:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

HTC invades Belgian train stations with miniature Android army
The master of bizarre marketing ploys, HTC, has employed a more militant approach to its latest PR stunt. In a move apparently aimed at promoting the launch of a bunch of new Android phones (specifically the Flyer, Sensation, Incredible S, Desire S, and Wildfire S), the outfit meticulously filled railway stations in Antwerp, Brussels, and Namur with varied configurations of the little green monsters. While the stunt’s grabbed our attention, we’re happy the bantam buggers weren’t there to greet us at the outset of our morning commute. More pictures await you at the source link below.

HTC invades Belgian train stations with miniature Android army originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 10 Jun 2011 20:21:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceGadget Review  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Google has already made some tough moves to tackle fragmentation, but it’s clearly still wary of the problem. It’s just tweaked the Android Market web store to show users which apps are compatible with which of their gadgets. Of course, compatibility screening was already in place for users who accessed the Market from within their device, but this update should still be of use to those who surf the web store, especially if they’re rocking multiple handsets or a phone-plus-tablet combo.

Android Market web store now checks which apps are compatible with your devices originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 10 Jun 2011 06:27:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Android Central  |   | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

FaceNiff
Remember Firesheep? Well, the cookie snatching Firefox extension now has a more portable cousin called FaceNiff. This Android app listens in on WiFi networks (even ones encrypted with WEP, WPA, or WPA2) and lets you hop on to the accounts of anyone sharing the wireless connection with you. Right now it works with Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Nasza-Klasa (a Polish Facebook clone), but developer Bartosz Ponurkiewicz promises more are coming. You’ll need to be rooted to run FaceNiff — luckily, we had such a device laying around and gave the tap-to-hack app a try. Within 30 seconds it identified the Facebook account we had open on our laptop and had us posting updates from the phone. At least with Firesheep you had to sit down and open up a laptop, now you can hijack Twitter profiles as you stroll by Starbucks and it’ll just look like you’re sending a text message (but you wouldn’t do that… would you?). One more image and a video are after the break.

Continue reading FaceNiff makes Facebook hacking a portable, one-tap affair (video)

FaceNiff makes Facebook hacking a portable, one-tap affair (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Jun 2011 02:28:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceFaceNiff  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


We’ve recently seen Google crack down on rogue apps and patch some server-side security issues, but let’s not forget Android does have a small measure of built-in security: app permissions. But as with those pesky EULAs, many users tend to breeze through the permissions screen. And Android forces even the most attentive readers to accept or deny all permissions requested by an app. But the newest nightly builds of the CyanogenMod custom ROM include a clever patch allowing users to grant and revoke permissions individually — something like the TISSA security manager we’re still awaiting. Obviously playing God with permissions can crash your applications: with great power comes great responsibility. But we figure if you’re running aftermarket firmware on a rooted phone, you’re comfortable experimenting. See how it works in the video after the break, then hit the source link to download.

Continue reading New CyanogenMod lets you rule Android app permissions with an iron fist

Filed under: Cellphones, Software

New CyanogenMod lets you rule Android app permissions with an iron fist originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 24 May 2011 13:34:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Androinica  |  sourceCyanogenMod  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


The HTC EVO 3D and LG Optimus 3D just got themselves a new buddy in the three-dee picture-taking arena in the shape of Sharp’s Aquos Phone SH-12C. We know, that name just rolls off the tongue. What’s remarkable about the 12C is that the dual cameras on its back go all the way up to 8 megapixels (to the EVO 3D’s 5), which will be creating quite the tasty workload for the 1.4GHz Qualcomm MSM8255 chip contained within. A qHD (540 x 960) screen resolution also keeps up with HTC’s latest, though the 4.2-inch, 3D-capable display on the Aquos offers more pixel density and less in absolute real estate. Android 2.3, replete with some evident customizations, will serve as the OS, and 720p video recording in 3D will also be available when Sharp launches the 12C in Japan on May 20th. Rest of the world? Well, we can dream about it right now.

Sharp Aquos Phone SH-12C has 3D cameras, qHD resolution, Gingerbread filling originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 11 May 2011 05:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Impress Watch  |  sourceSharp (JP)  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

It’s not quite official but there’s little doubt that Google will launch its Google Music service at its big I/O event later today. While the Wall Street Journal couldn’t get a Google spokesman to admit it, Peter Kafka over at All Things D got Jamie Rosenberg, Director of Android Product Management, to spill the details a bit early. Google’s service will essentially mimic the music locker functionality of Amazon’s Cloud service, albeit without the ability to sell songs direct to consumers. Ouch. Unfortunately, Google’s plans to launch a more feature-complete service were derailed when discussions with the labels broke down. According to Rosenberg, “A couple of the major labels were less focused on the innovative vision that we put forward, and more interested in an unreasonable and unsustainable set of business terms.” So, rather than putting the service on hold, Google will launch its music service with the ability to store up to 20,000 of your own uploaded songs for free which you can then stream over the web to your desktop or Android phone or tablet — any device that supports Flash (don’t worry iOS users, your time will come). Amazon’s service, by comparison, offers just 5GB of free storage for about 1,200 songs stored at a mediocre bitrate. Google will also best Amazon with a feature that automatically creates playlists. Google expects to roll out the service to its US users within “weeks” with Music Beta invites going out later today to Verizon Xoom owners (others will be able to sign up at music.google.com). Keep it right here because we’ll be bringing you the announcement live.

Google Music to stream 20,000 songs for free, launches at I/O later today originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 10 May 2011 02:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Wall Street Journal  |  sourceAll Things D  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Look away now, Kaz, because it looks like this KIRF NGP is on track to beat the real deal to market. Known as the iReadyGo RG on Chinese forum CNGBA, this shameless rip-off is set to be a near-carbon copy of Sony’s upcoming console with the same 5-inch touchscreen, though it isn’t clear whether this will also be of OLED nature or of identical resolution. Other differences include the missing touchpad on the back, as well as the buttons’ color scheme that’s no doubt “inspired” by the Xbox 360 controller. The rest of the rumored specs include a 1GHz Cortex-A8 CPU, 720p camera, HDMI-out, and video playback compatibility for MP4, WMV, AVI, and many more. But what’s most interesting is that apparently we’ll be seeing some Android love here, and indeed, iReadyGo is currently recruiting six senior Android developers. No word on pricing or availability yet, but we’ll probably wait for Sony’s quad-core offering, thank you very much. Head past the break for a shot of the RG’s glossy back.

[Thanks, rrw]

Continue reading Keepin’ it real fake: Sony NGP with Xbox 360 livery shows up in China

Keepin’ it real fake: Sony NGP with Xbox 360 livery shows up in China originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 05 May 2011 02:22:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Obscure Handhelds  |  sourceCNGBA  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
Blog WebMastered by All in One Webmaster.
  • RSS
  • YouTube
  • IMDb

Featuring YD Feedwordpress Content Filter Plugin