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During our trip to Sony HQ earlier this summer to check out the NEX-C3, company reps hinted that the best was yet to come — and held true to their word. Today’s NEX-7 release breaks a handful of digicam records, becoming not only the first mirrorless camera to pack a 24.3 megapixel APS-C sensor, but the first APS-C cam of any shape and size to smash through this notable barrier — potentially delivering unparalleled image quality for a camera of its size. Sony’s new flagship mirrorless interchangeable lens camera (ILC) also features the same OLED viewfinder included with its brand-new Alpha A77, delivering XGA (1024 x 768-pixel) resolution directly to your eye. There’s also 1080 / 60p AVCHD video capture, a full-size hot shoe, and a completely redesigned “Tri-Navi” interface. We spent a few minutes with a pre-production NEX-7 earlier this month — jump past the break for our initial impressions.

Gallery: Sony Alpha NEX-7 (hands-on)

Continue reading Sony unveils NEX-7: 24.3 MP sensor, OLED viewfinder, $1199 price tag (video)

Sony unveils NEX-7: 24.3 MP sensor, OLED viewfinder, $1199 price tag (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 24 Aug 2011 01:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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I remember borrowing a professional camera from a cousin for my African Safari Honeymoon. You would expect me to capture some really gorgeous pictures of lions making their kill, well to cut a long story short, I had no clue how to work the thing, so I ended up overexposing some pictures and taking out-of-focus shots. Thankfully the current generation of DSLRs is more forgiving towards amateurs. But basics like lighting and exposure can still intimidate some, hence the need for the Flower! A lens cap that allows you to automatically capture some stunning shots by simply regulating the light exposure; ok Africa, here I come!

Designers: Rhie Hyi Joong & Lee Sang Hwa

Flower is a 2011 Spark Awards winner.

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Source: Yanko Design
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Ever since the iPhone camera was invented, it’s aspired to be what it simply never quite could be: a DSLR. Sure, apps have helped your camera phone inch forward with simulated focusing F-X and faux filters. Faux no more. The iPhone SLR Mount gives you the real thing. It’ll set your phone photos apart from everyone else’s on Instagram in an unprecedented way. This case-adapter combo lets you mount your Canon EOS or Nikon SLR lenses to your iPhone 4 giving your phone powerful depth of field and manual focus. Telephoto, wide angle, macro, or your fixed fifty lenses all attach to this mount giving you a full range of lenses at your iPhone fingertips. Two loopholes on each end of the case let you tie on a camera strap, so you can hang it around your neck just like your real DSLR. Priced at $190 USD, both Canon and Nikon mounts are available now through Photojojo.


Source: Hypebeast
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So you flew around the world for a photo assignment, camera bag packed full of high-end lenses, but forgot the DSLR on the kitchen counter. Not to worry! You never leave home without your iPhone 4 and its new must-have accessory: the iPhone SLR Mount. $190 scores you one of these aluminum bad boys, eager to pair with your multi-thousand dollar Canon or Nikon optics, bringing “powerful depth of field” and manual focus to your smartphone’s itsy bitsy image sensor. You can reportedly use the new pricey mobile rig to capture photos with shallow depth of field, without the need to add one of those “unethical” $5 digital filter apps. The accessory is ready to ship, so you’re just 24 hours (and a couple hundred dollars) away from having this life-changing masterpiece sent straight to your door. As for us? We’re holding out a bit longer for the iPad version.

iPhone 4 SLR Mount lets you shoot 5-megapixel photos with your $3,000 lens originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 07 Jul 2011 13:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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Just when we thought ancient wooden boxes were all the rage among camera collectors, a compact beauty has shattered our theories — this 1923 Leica 0-series just sold at auction for €1,320,000, or about 1.89 million in US money. Curiously enough, the exact same auction house reportedly sold the exact same camera four years ago: No. 107, the first Leica to be exported, allegedly for a patent application inspection in New York. In 2007, it fetched a relatively paltry €336,000, which was apparently still a world record for Leica cameras at the time. Quite the return on that investment, no? Find more pictures and details at the links below.

1923 Leica 0-series becomes world’s most expensive camera, fetches $1.89 million at auction originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 28 May 2011 16:37:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Leica Rumors  |  sourceAP, AFP (Herald Sun)  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
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If you think schlepping a tripod along with your DSLR isn’t worth it because you’re convinced you can get a clean shot if you just concentrate hard enough, we have to ask… how’s that working out for ya? To demonstrate the destructive power of shaky hands, Camera Technica attached a laser to the hotshoe of a Canon 7D, with the light reflecting off a wall 20 feet away. The lesson: it’s challenging enough to get a crisp shot with a tripod — let alone without. In the video below, the laser point wobbles erratically when the photographer gingerly presses the shutter with his finger. In the second clip he uses a remote release, which visibly cuts, but doesn’t eliminate, the shake. Only when he locks up the mirror and resorts to a remote release does the shaking drop to a minimum. Need some more vivid evidence? We highly suggest heading past the break for a demo that might just make you reconsider that decision not to pack a Gorillapod.

Continue reading Lasers prove you can’t hold a camera still (video)

Lasers prove you can’t hold a camera still (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 03 May 2011 15:21:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: Engadget
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