VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


This is your brain. And now this is your brain on YouTube. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) software, researchers at UC Berkeley created a visual representation of what our brains see when we watch a TV or movie. It works as such: scientists show subjects random clips and measure the corresponding cerebral activity. After the computer “learns” what vids evoke what brain activity, scientists feed 18 million seconds of random YouTube videos into the computer program where it reconstructs a movie representation of neural happenings based on the hundred clips most similar to what it sees. Although the method currently only works with images actually viewed, the future goal is to recreate what people see in their dreams and memories — which could give doctors major insight to the minds of the mentally impaired, stroke victims or those with neurological disorders. Inception in real life isn’t exactly around the corner, but the implications of this new technology are pretty mind-blowing. See for yourself in the video after the break — no totem required.

Continue reading Scientists reconstruct images from our brains, plan to do the same for dreams (video)

Scientists reconstruct images from our brains, plan to do the same for dreams (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 23 Sep 2011 03:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink i09  |  sourceUC Berkeley  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)



It’s difficult to imagine The Shining being any more terrifying than its original release, but Duke Nukem has never cared much about impossible odds, and it’s taken on the challenge like a champ. Film fanatic and analyst Rob Ager has compiled a video dissecting the spatial anomalies in The Shining’s Overlook Hotel, as discovered through a Duke Nukem 3D mod attempting to recreate the building. Ager describes the impossible hallways, windows, apartments and stairways littering the Overlook that lend Kubrick’s movie a subconsciously eerie, something’s not quite right vibe.

Ager’s detailed analysis borders on crazed obsession, but it provides thrilling insight into a classic film — we just think he should take a vacation after this one. After all, all work and no play…

JoystiqDuke Nukem finally figures out what’s wrong in The Shining’s Overlook Hotel originally appeared on Joystiq on Sun, 24 Jul 2011 18:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments

Source: Joystiq
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Australian jewelry designers band together to creatively promote their works
melbourne-metal1.jpg

More than an online boutique, Melbourne Metal Collective is an artist-run retail concept for Australia’s up-and-coming jewelry designs with a strong focus on the community of craftspeople who make them. MMC hosts exhibitions, pop-up shops and more to highlight the fresh roster of bright minds currently making up their site, which includes Estelle Deve, Hamish Munro, Henson, Polly van der Glas and Young Hunting.

young-hunting1.jpg

Alchemy—MMC's first exhibition and pop-up store—reflects the consortium's sophisticated earthy vibe, recalling the ancient Greek practice of melding metals. For the opening, the Collective commissioned a short film by South African director Michael Matthews, highlighting pieces and adding to the collective’s overall creative atmosphere.

thisishenson1.jpg

Working primarily with raw materials (at times including hair and teeth), together MMC designers evoke a strong sense of mysticism and urban simplicity. Each offers their own style, but through a seemingly shared interest in the past, the collective creates beautiful pieces that transcend time.

estelle-deve1.jpg

Select works from each of the designers are available from the MMC shop, where you can also find out more about what the Melbourne-based collective is up to next on their blog.


Source: Cool Hunting
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

A computer solving a Rubik’s cube? P’shaw. Doing it in 10.69 seconds? Been there, record set. But to crack one of any size? Color us impressed. Erik Demaine of MIT did just that, developing an algorithm that applies to cubes no matter how ambitious their dimensions. Pretty early on, he realized he needed to take a different angle than he would with a standard 3 x 3 x 3 puzzle, which other scientists have tackled by borrowing computers from Google to consider all 43 quintillion possible moves — a strategy known simply as “brute force.” As you can imagine, that’s not exactly a viable solution when you’re wrestling with an 11 x 11 x 11 cube. So Demaine and his team settled on an approach that’s actually a riff on one commonly used by Rubik’s enthusiasts, who might attempt to move a square into its desired position while leaving the rest of the cube as unchanged as possible. That’s a tedious way to go, of course, so instead The researchers grouped several cubies that all needed to go in the same direction, a tactic that reduced the number of moves by a factor of log n, with n representing the length of any of the cube’s sides. Since moving individual cubies into an ideal spot requires a number of moves equal to n², the final algorithm is n²/log n. If we just lost you non-math majors with that formula, rest assured that the scientists expect folks won’t be able to apply it directly, per se, though he does say it could help cube-solvers sharpen their strategy. Other that, all you overachievers out there, you’re still on your own with that 20 x 20 x 20.

Scientists develop algorithm to solve Rubik’s cubes of any size originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 01 Jul 2011 12:57:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceNew Scientist  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Researchers over in the land of the robot-obsessed have found a new, non-invasive way to control your hand while your brain recoils in horror. Reassuringly named the PossessedHand, this belt of electro-stimulation wraps its pad of twenty-eight electrodes around your forearm triggering a range of sixteen bewitched joint actions. Project leader Emi Tamaki claims it feels more like a light massage than say, a full-on Freejack. However, one test subject confessed, “[It was] like my body was hacked” — so that’s comforting. This joint production between the University of Tokyo’s Rekimoto Lab and Sony Computer Science Laboratories was first tested as a musical training aide, but could someday help stroke victims regain mobility. For now, the stimulation isn’t strong enough to turn you into an automated Steve Vai (or secret assassin), but it definitely lends new meaning to ‘hands-off.’ Check the video after the break for a demonstration and some unsettling narration.

Continue reading Tokyo researchers hijack your hand, help you play the koto (video)

Tokyo researchers hijack your hand, help you play the koto (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 26 Jun 2011 09:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink DVICE  |  sourceRekimoto Lab  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

TactileBrush
Poor arachnophobes — it’s bad enough that 3D movies can make it look like swarms of eight-legged freaks are pouring out of the screen, now Disney wants you to feel the creepy crawlies, too. In a presumed effort to one-up those “4D” chairs used at Shrek’s castle down in Orlando, the company has been working on what it calls Tactile Brush — a chair with an array of 12 vibrating coils that are able to simulate anything from the sensation of speeding around a race track to the delicate drip of rain on your back. Two techniques are used: apparent motion, which triggers two motors in quick succession to create the illusion of something moving over your skin, and phantom sensation, in which two stationary vibrations are felt as a single tingle between the two points. Disney researchers demoed Tactile Brush at the Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in Vancouver using a racing game, but hope to bring it to amusement park rides and movie theaters — which, in the right hands, should lead to more screaming and at least a few pairs of wet pants.

Tactile Brush uses sensory illusions to let you feel games, movies originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 28 May 2011 13:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink NewScientist, Wired  |  sourceDisney Research Pittsburgh  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


If you think schlepping a tripod along with your DSLR isn’t worth it because you’re convinced you can get a clean shot if you just concentrate hard enough, we have to ask… how’s that working out for ya? To demonstrate the destructive power of shaky hands, Camera Technica attached a laser to the hotshoe of a Canon 7D, with the light reflecting off a wall 20 feet away. The lesson: it’s challenging enough to get a crisp shot with a tripod — let alone without. In the video below, the laser point wobbles erratically when the photographer gingerly presses the shutter with his finger. In the second clip he uses a remote release, which visibly cuts, but doesn’t eliminate, the shake. Only when he locks up the mirror and resorts to a remote release does the shaking drop to a minimum. Need some more vivid evidence? We highly suggest heading past the break for a demo that might just make you reconsider that decision not to pack a Gorillapod.

Continue reading Lasers prove you can’t hold a camera still (video)

Lasers prove you can’t hold a camera still (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 03 May 2011 15:21:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Wired  |  sourceCamera Technica  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


Mark this day, folks, because the brainiacs have finally made a breakthrough in quantum teleportation: a team of scientists from Australia and Japan have successfully transferred a complex set of quantum data in light form. You see, previously researchers had struggled with slow performance or loss of information, but with full transmission integrity achieved — as in blocks of qubits being destroyed in one place but instantaneously resurrected in another, without affecting their superpositions — we’re now one huge step closer to secure, high-speed quantum communication. Needless to say, this will also be a big boost for the development of powerful quantum computing, and combine that with a more bedroom friendly version of the above teleporter, we’ll eventually have ourselves the best LAN party ever.

First light wave quantum teleportation achieved, opens door to ultra fast data transmission originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 18 Apr 2011 08:33:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Gizmodo  |  sourceUniversity of New South Wales  | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)


National Geographic‘s upcoming television series How Hard Can It Be? sent Scientists, engineers and pilots from Southern California into the Mojave Desert to try to recreate Carl Fredricksen’s flying house from the Pixar computer animated movie Up. They attempted to lift a lightweight 16 x 16ft yellow house construction with 300 colored helium-filled balloons. Did it work? How high did the house get off the ground? Watch the video after the jump.

Source: /Film
VN:F [1.9.9_1125]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week’s most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us — it’s the Week in Green.



This week Inhabitat brought you unveilings of the world’s hottest new eco vehicles as we hit the floor of the Detroit Auto Show and rounded up the seven sexiest green cars on display. We also took a first look at Toyota’s new Tesla-infused RAV4, and we caught up with Venturi’s powerhouse electric concept car. And if unconventional transportation spins your wheels, don’t miss the shape shifting Uno 3 electric scooter and this masterfully-crafted Tron segway that could out-geek a lightcycle.

We also looked at several groundbreaking building systems that stand to make our cities stronger and more sustainable, starting with a new type of flexible superglass that is stronger than steel. Meanwhile, Sweden is soaking up body heat from public places to help heat buildings, China unveiled plans for a futuristic eco city, and several offices in Minnesota flipped on a set of souped-up ceiling lights capable of broadcasting wireless internet.

In other news, the world of renewable energy is jolting for joy as Southwest Wind Power unveiled the world’s first fully smart grid-enabled windturbine. We also checked out a new ultracapacitor that can charge a power drill in 60 seconds, and researchers are working on energy-generating fabrics that can transform your t-shirt into a power plant. Finally, this week we wrapped up our CES coverage with a look at the best green gadgets from this year’s show, and we flexed our creative capacity with 5 tech projects for kids that foster creativity and critical thinking.

Inhabitat’s Week in Green: sexy green cars, glass strong as steel, and Tianjin’s Eco-City revealed originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 16 Jan 2011 20:45:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments

Source: Engadget
Blog WebMastered by All in One Webmaster.
  • RSS
  • YouTube
  • IMDb

Featuring YD Feedwordpress Content Filter Plugin